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New employment laws arrive in California

On Behalf of | Mar 15, 2022 | Employment Law - Employees, Employment Law - Employers, Mediation |

Not all business owners and company executives follow employment laws. Their misdeeds could leave an employee or contractor suffering financially or worse. California legislators took steps to address problems in the workforce, and 2022 will see several new laws go into effect. These laws may curtail employer abuses since the threats of legal troubles might force compliance.

Laws changing in 2022

Changes to California employment-related laws impact health, medical, discrimination, and other issues. For many years, California lawmakers sought to address abuses related to independent contractor status. Many residents might follow local news covering changes to independent contractor classifications. However, they might not realize that lawmakers also took action to limit non-disparagement and non-disclosure provisions in settlements associated with gender discrimination, sexual harassment, and sexual assault.

Limiting the use of non-disclosure agreements makes it difficult for a company to hide misdeeds. The inability to hide behind a non-disclosure clause could lead to businesses taking better steps to prevent troubling behavior.

Other aspects of employment law and rule changes

Changes to existing laws will affect the California Family Rights Act. Under the law’s provisions, an eligible employee may take up to 12 weeks off to care for a family member. New revisions extend “family members” to include parents-in-law. Also, the revisions tweak rules regarding workplace mediation for small businesses.

Business owners and managers might find it helpful to review the various changes in the law. Understanding the new rules could improve compliance and avoid potential legal troubles.

Employees may find it worthwhile to read about the new changes. After all, the laws affect them as well. Understanding the law might allow an employee to take swifter action if a violation occurs.